Via Health Impact News (healthimpactnews.com)

by Patrick Howley
National File

Excerpts:

The Army National Guard is actively recruiting for a job position called “Internment/Resettlement Specialist.” People as young as seventeen years old are eligible for the gig, which includes “Search/Restraint” as “Some of the Skills You’ll Learn,” according to an Army National Guard job posting with a job location listed as Washington, D.C.

Meanwhile, military documents show that the military can detain civilians here in America, including U.S. citizens.

A leaked U.S. Headquarters of the Army document entitled “INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS” describes an official category of detained person called “civilian internee.”

A Department of Defense Directive published below discussed “civilian internees” and made it clear that military detainees can be U.S. citizens.

“In the Army National Guard, you will learn these valuable job skills while earning a regular paycheck and qualifying for tuition assistance. Job training for an Internment Resettlement Specialist requires 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training, where you’ll learn basic Soldiering skills, and seven weeks of Advanced Individual Training with on-the-job instruction. Part of this time is spent in the classroom and part of the time in the field,” states this Army National Guard job posting.

Note the location for the job: Washington, D.C.

“Internment/resettlement specialists are primarily responsible for day-to-day operations in a military confinement/correctional facility or detention/internment facility,” according to an Army National Guard job posting that touts “A monthly paycheck” as a benefit to being an internment and resettlement specialist.

Department of Defense DIRECTIVE Number 2310.01E issued on August 19, 2014 states (emphasis added):

“Subject to the requirements of the law of war and this directive, POWs and unprivileged belligerents may lawfully be detained until a competent authority determines that the conflict has ended or that active hostilities have ceased, and civilian internees may lawfully be detained until the reasons that necessitated the civilian’s internment no longer exist.”

Read the full article at the National File.